B-Complex

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This scientific research is for informational use only. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Care/of provides this information as a service. This information should not be read to recommend or endorse any specific products.

B vitamins are found in many foods, but if you aren’t eating a balanced diet, you may be missing some of these eight essential vitamins. For instance, vitamin B12 can only be obtained through meat products. If you aren’t sure that you are getting enough B vitamins from your diet, supplementation may be beneficial to you.

Vegetarian

Vegetarians and vegans are often deficient in vitamin B12 because it is a vitamin largely found in animal products, not in plant or grain-based products except those that are fortified with it.

References
  1. Health effects of vegan diets
    Winston J Craig,
    The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,
    2009
  2. Nutritional Update for Physicians: Plant-Based Diets
    Tuso PJ, Ismail MH, Ha BP, Bartolotto C.,
    The Permanente Journal,
    2013
  3. Vitamin B12 - Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet
    Office of dietary supplements,
    National Institutes of Health,
    2016

Gluten Free

People adhering to a gluten-free diet may be low in folic acid, Vitamin B12 and Vitamin B6. Supplementing with a b-complex may be a good way to fill in nutritional gaps associated with a gluten-free diet.

References
  1. Clinical trial: B vitamins improve health in patients with coeliac disease living on a gluten-free diet
    Hallert C, Svensson M, Tholstrup J, Hultberg B.,
    Ailment Pharmacology & Therapeutics,
    2009
  2. Evidence of poor vitamin status in coeliac patients on a gluten-free diet for 10 years
    Hallert C, Grant C, Grehn S, Granno C , Hulten S, Midhagen G, Strom M, Svensson H, & Valdimarsson T. ,
    Ailment Pharmacology & Therapeutics,
    2002

Risk Factors

B vitamins are very important and many people get less than the recommended daily amount of these nutrients. Certain groups are at higher risk for depletion of B vitamins, including people adhering to a gluten-free diet, people who don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables, and people who frequently consume alcohol.

References
  1. Relationships between nutrition, alcohol use, and liver disease.
    Lieber CS.,
    Alcohol Research and Health,
    2003
  2. Frequently asked questions - Alcohol
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
    2016
  3. Health Benefits of Fruits and Vegetables
    Slavin JL & Lloyd B. ,
    Advances in nutrition,
    2012
  4. Evidence of poor vitamin status in coeliac patients on a gluten-free diet for 10 years
    Hallert C, Grant C, Grehn S, Granno C , Hulten S, Midhagen G, Strom M, Svensson H, & Valdimarsson T. ,
    Ailment Pharmacology & Therapeutics,
    2002
  5. Clinical trial: B vitamins improve health in patients with coeliac disease living on a gluten-free diet
    Hallert C, Svensson M, Tholstrup J, Hultberg B.,
    Ailment Pharmacology & Therapeutics,
    2009

Nervous System

B vitamins are essential for the nervous system. They are important for several aspects of brain function: chemical signaling, energy production and synthesis of DNA and RNA all depend on these water soluble vitamins. B vitamins support homocysteine levels and are necessary for proper cellular functioning as they are a coenzyme for enzymatic reactions.

For more information on B vitamins, check out the scientific articles below:

http://advances.nutrition.org/content/3/6/801.full

http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/8/2/68/htm

References
  1. B Vitamins and the Brain: Mechanisms, Dose and Efficacy—A Review
    Kennedy, DO,
    Nutrients,
    2016
  2. The Role of B Vitamins in Preventing and Treating Cognitive Impairment and Decline
    Martha Savaria Morris,
    Advances in Nutrition: An International Review Journal,
    2012

Hair and Nails

Biotin may play a role in supporting nail health. Researchers conducted a study of 22 volunteers and found that 2.5 mg biotin daily for 6-15 months improved cases of brittle nails, increased nail thickness and lamellar splitting. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) concluded that a cause and effect relationship has been established between the consumption of biotin and maintenance of normal hair.

References
  1. Treatment of brittle fingernails and onychoscizia with biotin: scanning electron microscopy.
    Colombo VE, Gerber F, Bronhofer M, Floersheim GL,
    J Am Acad Dermatol,
    1990
  2. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to biotin and energy-yielding metabolism (ID 114,117), macronutrient metabolism (ID 113, 114, 117), maintenance of skin and mucous membranes (ID 115), maintenance of hair (ID 118, 2876) and function of the nervous system (ID 116) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006.
    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA),
    EFSA Journal,
    2009
The following scientific research is for informational use only. Care/of provides this information as a service and does not receive compensation for studies referenced. This information should not be read to recommend or endorse any specific products. Dietary supplements are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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