Hamburger black

Magnesium

Research Library

This scientific research is for informational use only. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Care/of provides this information as a service. This information should not be read to recommend or endorse any specific products.

Magnesium affects more than 300 enzymes in the body. It is involved in glucose control, regulating blood pressure, nervous system processes, and muscle function, and is required for energy production. It is also an important structural component of our bones. In fact, 60% of the magnesium in our body is stored in the skeletal system. Magnesium can be found in numerous foods, in especially high quantities in spinach, nuts, and beans. Excessive alcohol intake, diabetes, the use of PPI-drugs and certain stomach disorders can affect absorption of magnesium.

PMS headaches

One of the top premenstrual syndrome symptoms experienced by women is headaches. A 1991 study attempted to address this concern with magnesium supplementation. 20 patients were given 360mg/day of magnesium or a placebo. After two months, both the placebo and treatment groups reported decreased pain from headaches; however, the magnesium group also reported fewer incidences of headaches, while the placebo group did not.

References
  1. Magnesium prophylaxis of menstrual migraine: effects on intracellular magnesium.
    Facchinetti F, Sances G, Borella P, Genazzani AR, Nappi G.,
    Headache,
    1991

Pregnancy

One of the functions of magnesium is regulating blood pressure. A common problem that women experience during pregnancy is gestational hypertension. 61 pregnant women were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study to assess the effect of magnesium on gestational hypertension. After 12 weeks of supplementation, the average diastolic blood pressure and incidence of hypertension was significantly lower in the group receiving magnesium. Higher urinary magnesium levels were associated with lower blood pressure during the study.

References
  1. Magnesium supplementation to prevent high blood pressure in pregnancy: a randomised placebo control trial.
    Bullarbo M, Ödman N, Nestler A, Nielsen T, Kolisek M, Vormann J, Rylander R.,
    Archives of gynecology and obstetrics,
    2013

Headaches

In 1996, a double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed to assess the effect of magnesium on migraines. During weeks 9 through 12 of the study, frequency of migraines was reduced by 41.6% in the magnesium group, compared to only a 15.8% reduction in the placebo group. The duration and intensity of the migraines was slightly lower in the magnesium group, but not significant. Additionally, the study was on a high dose of magnesium, 600mg per day, which caused diarrhea in 18.6% of the treatment group.

References
  1. Prophylaxis of migraine with oral magnesium: results from a prospective, multi-center, placebo-controlled and double-blind randomized study.
    Peikert A, Wilimzig C, Köhne-Volland R.,
    Cephalalgia,
    1996

Optimal magnesium levels may help with the relief of ocassional sleeplessness.

Optimal magnesium levels may help with the relief of ocassional sleeplessness.

References
  1. Magnesium involvement in sleep: genetic and nutritional models.
    Chollet D, Franken P, Raffin Y, Henrotte JG, Widmer J, Malafosse A, Tafti M.,
    Behavior genetics,
    2001
  2. Oral Mg(2+) supplementation reverses age-related neuroendocrine and sleep EEG changes in humans.
    Held K1, Antonijevic IA, Künzel H, Uhr M, Wetter TC, Golly IC, Steiger A, Murck H.,
    Pharmacopsychiatry,
    2002
  3. The effect of magnesium supplementation on primary insomnia in elderly: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.
    Abbasi B, Kimiagar M, Sadeghniiat K, Shirazi MM, Hedayati M, Rashidkhani B.,
    Journal of research in medical sciences: the official journal of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences,
    2012

Insomnia

Insomnia is a problem for people of all ages, but it tends to get worse as we age. Insomnia can cause a number of symptoms including difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and awakening feeling unrested. In a 2012 clinical study, 46 elderly adults were given 500mg of magnesium or a placebo. The magnesium group experienced improvements in sleep efficiency, concentration of serum renin, cortisol and melatonin. Actual total time asleep was not different between the two groups.

References
  1. The effect of magnesium supplementation on primary insomnia in elderly: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.
    Abbasi B, Kimiagar M, Sadeghniiat K, Shirazi MM, Hedayati M, Rashidkhani B.,
    Journal of research in medical sciences: the official journal of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences,
    2012

Alcohol

People who consume alcohol frequently are at a higher risk for magnesium inadequacy or deficiency.

References
  1. Magnesium - Health Professional Fact Sheet
    Office of Dietary Supplements,
    National Institutes of Health,
    2016